“It Might Be Wonderful”

I was searching for the source of a quote I read years ago, whose essence has stuck with me, if not it’s precise language. It was attributed to Gloria Steinem.

She said, “The great thing about not knowing what comes next…” (and I thought, Yes? Yes? What is it? Please tell me what’s great about all this not knowing business!!) “…is that it might be wonderful.”

“That’s all? It might be wonderful?” Insufficient payoff for the terrible heaviness of not knowing.

I’ve spent much of the past few years trying to live into her radically optimistic world view. For me, not knowing what came next was painful, almost unbearable. In the cosmic sense, of course, none of us knows what’s next (earthquake, or flood, or call from the Nobel committee, etc.). But much of the time we think we do. We have enough information at least to predict what next month or next year brings. For me, the decision to sell our house a few years ago launched us on a journey of major not knowing. I wanted the quote as a lead-in to the book I’m working on about that journey.

moving day

Because the journey has moved me toward understanding that quote. It has taught me that not knowing becomes easier.

Riverside Park at sunset

Not easy, but easier. I try to live more in the second half of Gloria’s statement than in the first. It might be wonderful.

Cannonball into Merry Meeting Lake, New Hampshire

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Laura on Rope Swing, Lake Todd (Newbury, NH)

Yeah, that’s right. And it’s up to us to make it wonderful.

DSC01213

I didn’t find that quote today, but I did find a rich and deep interview of a curious and brilliant mind. I give you Maria Shriver interviewing Gloria Steinem, and two of my favorite passages from their conversation:

The most hopeful.

SHRIVER: Do you think that you ran a revolution? Do you think it was successful?

STEINEM: Well, first of all, I think we’ve just begun. If you think about the Suffrage Movement as a precedent, it took more than 100 years to get the vote and for that movement itself to run a certain course. We’re only about 40 years into this movement, so this particular wave of change certainly has a long way to go. It’s not in the past.

The most daunting.

SHRIVER: Is there some part of your life that you think represents a cautionary tale?

STEINEM: I think the biggest thing is probably that I wasted time.

SHRIVER: You feel like you wasted time? In what way?

STEINEM: I continued for too long to do things that I already knew how to do, or to write stories that I was assigned instead of fighting for stories that I couldn’t get, or doing ones that I thought were important on my own. The wasting of time is the thing I worry about the most. Because time is all there is.

You heard her. Back to work.

rosie-the-riveter

http://www.interviewmagazine.com/culture/gloria-steinem/

9 thoughts on ““It Might Be Wonderful”

  1. Thanks for the fantastic inspiration. I’m going to go find something wonderful – and different – for the whole family to do this weekend!!

    • I’m glad you found this inspiring. I wondered, what if we hadn’t left our house, would we still find something wonderful? It’s not necessary to literally leave your physical spaces, so long as you can find other ways to leave your comfort zones. Shaking things up is a liberating, even if anxiety-provoking, practice.

    • Thanks, Susan. It was joyful to go back and see pictures from some of our adventures. It has been one of the best parts about working on the draft of the book. Hopefully it will turn into something valuable for other people who have gone through their own rough patches and found silver linings in them, too.

    • Thanks, Caitlin. The photo of the barn is in Stowe, Vermont, and we were on a trail ride that meandered along the 5-mile Stowe Recreation Path. You can walk and ride bikes along the path, and in the winter people snow shoe on it. The rope swing was a little slice of heaven in New Hampshire, Todd Lake, in the Sunapee region. All of the photos are from places we never would have visited then if we hadn’t been in a major transition! And…they were wonderful. Kids still talk about them to this day, five years after we were there.

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